celebrex 200 mg cost

Accomplishments

Home Repair

WCDC assisted 27 families with major home repairs utilizing City of Indianapolis / HUD Community Development Block (CDBG) Grant funds. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) weatherization contract was wrapped up with a total of 35 units being weatherized. This program was sponsored by Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA). Some homes received help from both programs; 24 were unduplicated. 11 families that received ARRA weatherization also received help from a special CDBG program through IHCDA.

Homeownership

WCDC sold one house in 2011 and completed construction on 740 N. Belmont with Ben Davis Area 31 Career Center. This vocational education program takes high school students and teaches them the fundamentals of construction. Each year’s class since 2004 has built a new home for WCDC. The 2011 fall class began its first rehabilitation with WCDC on 733 N. Rochester. The first activity of the class was to evaluate the existing house and prepare a scope of work. They then made a presentation to WCDC staff. Also in 2011, WCDC began working on a second rehabilitation project at 1657 N. Belleview. It was a challenge after years of only new construction; however the finished product is lovely. It shows very well and has generated many inquiries.

Families in Transition (FITs)

The FITs program successfully provided housing and supportive services to 15 families in 2011. Among the families served, 69% were employed and 54% were enrolled in educational or job training programs. FITs helped the children in the program to get new clothes and supplies for school. The program arranged for the families to receive Christmas assistance. During the year, 529 – 31 N. Lynn was sold. WCDC was awarded a CDBG grant to repair 5 of the FITs units. Three other units needed more substantial repairs and WCDC worked with the City to repurpose one of the HOME grants to work on those units.

Property Management

WCDC made small to moderately-priced, but critical, repairs to Tibbs Court in preparation to pass REACT Inspection by Indianapolis Housing Agency (HUD). This investment helped the units to get a passing score on the inspection. A list of major repairs was prepared that may be addressed by a larger funding source, such as re-syndication. Conversations with consultants, developers and partners have begun. Christamore Court had a number of non-routine maintenance repairs made. The occupancy rate for both projects is high and rents have supported a slow rebuilding of the formerly depleted reserves.

Commercial

As part of a new focus on Michigan Street, WCDC has paid special attention to parcels it owns along the corridor. WCDC received an offer to purchase 2219 W. Michigan almost concurrently with a site status letter, which disallowed the potential buyer’s use. This led WCDC to apply for a Catalyst Grant through LISC to do a comprehensive plan for development along Michigan Street between White River and the railroad crossing at Warman Avenue. An environmental firm was also engaged to work on strategies and funding to further clean up or develop the 2219 site.

Other development

WCDC worked with Building Blocks Non-Profit Housing Corporation and others to support the development of the Lincoln Apartments at 530 N. Holmes for homeless veterans. WCDC also plans to make at least $100,000 in façade improvements along the Michigan corridor in the vicinity of the project, with the support of LISC and Capital Fund Services. In 2011 WCDC assisted two businesses in procuring and administering façade grants to improve their businesses. These locations are 2615 W. Michigan and 284 N. Belmont. WCDC also assisted two investor/ contractors to acquire properties from the Indianapolis Land Bank. Although the closing took several months, two houses were successfully transferred to these entrepreneurs and rehab began.

Target Populations

Below are descriptions of the populations WCDC currently serves. Data represents the households we actually work with rather than the limits of our various funding sources.

Homeless Families with Children

  • Income Range: $0 – $18,000 (0% – 30% AMI (Area Median Income))
  • Housing Type(s): Transitional Rental with Supportive Services
  • Rent: 30% of household income (rent subsidized by Section 8 & SHP)

Low-Income Seniors 

  • Renter Incomes: Renters: $7056 – $16,000 (median: $9,400)
  • Homeowner Incomes: $5,100 – $38,000 (8%-52% AMI; median: $13,000)
  • Housing Type(s): Multi-Unit Rental; Home Repair/Weatherization
  • Rent: $276 – $472 per month (most are between $365-381)
  • Existing Mortgage:  $0 – $763 per month

Low-Income Working Households

  • Income Range: $6,900-$42,000 (10%-76% AMI) (median: $20,000; 38% AMI)
  • Housing Type(s): Rental, New & Rehab; Home Repair/Weatherization
  • Rent: $250 – $450 a month
  • Homeownership – Purchase Price $50,000-$55,000 ($400-$450 per month)
  • Existing Mortgage:  $0 – $775

Modest-Income Working Households

  • Income Range: $21,000-$35,000 (40% – 80% AMI)
  • Housing Type(s): Single-Family Rental & Homeownership, New & Rehab
  • Rent: $450-$475
  • Homeownership Purchase Price: $56,000 – $63,000 ($480-$525 per month)